Another Coronavirus Crisis

Posted by Jeremy Eccles | 22.03.20

As the NT Government sensibly closes off access to remote Indigenous communities in response to the Coronavirus crisis, the foresightful academic, Jon Altman, working with Francis Markham of the ANU is concerned for the financial consequences as well as the health benefits. Courtesy of 'The Conversation' website thanks to its Creative Commons, written by Jon Altman and Francis Markham of ANU “Public health measures to reduce the spread of COVID-19 may be having an unintended effect on remote Indigenous communities. With the closure of Aboriginal lands to visitors, tourist visits have stopped abruptly along with the income from buying art they provided. In at least one large community, the art centre that sells the work of several hundred artists has stopped buying because stock levels are extraordinarily high and it has no money to buy. As well, the anticipated serious downturn in sales in city-based galleries is likely to be passed along the supply-chain, leaving many remote art centres short of funds to buy new work. The downturn may have begun with the economic slowdown in 2020, but it has been accelerated by COVID-19. Art sales are (or were) a lifeline The 2016 census tells us that for the first time on record, more than half the Indigenous people living in very remote Australia were below the poverty line. Since then, those incomes have plummeted. The median real personal income of working age Indigenous adults in remote Australia fell by about 20% between 2014–15 and 2018–19 according to our unpublished analysis of Australian Bureau of Statistics’ surveys. In the same ABS surveys only 30% of very remote households say they would be able to raise A$2000 within a week. About 30% say they have run out of money for basic living expenses at some time within the past 12 months.» Read More

 

BIENNALE OF SYDNEY 2020

BIENNALE OF SYDNEY 2020

Posted by Jeremy Eccles | 19.03.20

Biennales come and go and are often remarkably forgettable. Every second artist – whatever their cultural roots – seems to live in Berlin. The sort of globalisation that has brought us the coronavirus invariably flavours each show – art passed...» Read More

 

LAURIE NILSEN

LAURIE NILSEN

Posted by Jeremy Eccles | 13.03.20

Laurie Nilsen, the father of the barbed-wire emu, has died on March 6th at the age of 66 from cancer after a 40 year career in art. That is currently being celebrated with a retrospective at his Fireworks Gallery in...» Read More

 

Entries to Blake Prize Closing Soon

Entries to Blake Prize Closing Soon

Posted by Aboriginal Art Directory | 12.03.20

Time is running out to enter one of Australia's longest-running and most prestigious (and unpredictable) art prizes, the Blake Prize. Open to artists exploring the wider experience of spirituality, religion and belief, the Blake Prize engages artists nationally and internationally....» Read More

 

Indigenous Arts Infrastructure

Indigenous Arts Infrastructure

Posted by Jeremy Eccles | 06.03.20

A surprising article in 'The Australian' recently told me that the independent federal advisory body, Infrastructure Australia (IA) was telling the government that an investment in Indigenous art facilities was an excellent idea. And, as the federal government is currently...» Read More

 

EMILY v CLIFFORD

EMILY v CLIFFORD

Posted by Jeremy Eccles | 03.03.20

Who will emerge from the next couple of weeks as the dominant figure – Emily Kngwarreye or Clifford Possum? This pair of the greatest, now-dead Aboriginal artists could not have imagined such a competition; but circumstances in New York and...» Read More

 

The Ephemeral and the Ineradicable

The Ephemeral and the Ineradicable

Posted by Jeremy Eccles | 02.03.20

The recent reopening of the Hyde Park Barracks in central Sydney was greeted as a great Indigenous event for the 2500 square metre courtyard was transformed (briefly) by Wiradjuri artist Jonathan Jones into a First Nations statement. Some optimist even...» Read More

 

WADJUK IN THE BLACK

WADJUK IN THE BLACK

Posted by Jeremy Eccles | 25.02.20

There was a time when Indigenous performance was anathema to the market. Worthy, but not exactly a fun night out! Two Aboriginal festival directors – Stephen Page in Adelaide and Wesley Enoch in Sydney – have toyed with First Nations...» Read More

 

Current Exhibitions


Industry Corner: Industry

Another Coronavirus Crisis

Posted by Jeremy Eccles | 22.03.20

As the NT Government sensibly closes off access to remote Indigenous communities in response to the Coronavirus crisis, the foresightful academic, Jon Altman, working with Francis Markham of the ANU is concerned for the financial consequences as well as the...» Read More

Industry Corner: Event

BIENNALE OF SYDNEY 2020

Posted by Jeremy Eccles | 19.03.20

Biennales come and go and are often remarkably forgettable. Every second artist – whatever their cultural roots – seems to live in Berlin. The sort of globalisation that has brought us the coronavirus invariably flavours each show – art passed...» Read More

Events: Auction

Sotheby's NY Inaugural Aboriginal Art Auction

Posted by Aboriginal Art Directory | 17.12.19

The first dedicated Aboriginal art auction in the US by an international auction house was held by Sotheby's in New York on December 13. The sale surpassed its high estimate with 88% of all lots sold and set eight new...» Read More

Events: Event

The Auction Time of Year

Posted by Jeremy Eccles | 28.11.19

“Toward the end of 1991, women’s Awelye ceremonies were being held in Utopia. December was overwhelmingly humid with hot northerly winds. The anticipation of rain and the ongoing ceremonial activity enlivened the spiritual atmosphere. A number of exceptional paintings (by...» Read More

 

Upcoming Exhibitions

EMILY v CLIFFORD

03.03.20 EMILY v CLIFFORD
Utopia Arts Gallery, 983 Bourke Street, Waterloo, Sydney, Australia; D'Lan Davidson, High Line Nine, 507 West 27th Street, New York
» Find out More

The Ephemeral and the Ineradicable

02.03.20 The Ephemeral and the Ineradicable
Macquarie Street, Sydney
» Find out More