QUICKSILVER

Posted by Jeremy Eccles | 24.02.17

Nicolas Rothwell surprises, delights...and frustrates. The premiere writer about Indigenous culture in the country has written a book (though it's advertised as a collection of essays) which is poised on the brink of being a definitive study of the relationship between Aboriginal art, landscape and mythology, but then fails to draw the conclusions that seem to be the logical elucidation of so many arguments. Perhaps the explanation lies in reviewer Peter Craven's assessment in Rothwell's own newspaper, The Australian, “Rothwell is a writer who can alienate any reader because he can seem so swaddled in the connoisseurship of his own predicament”! In Quicksilver, that connoisseurship takes one form in his personal response to landscapes ranging from the endless Siberian taiga, via the trackless peaks of Switzerland's Engadine to the point where the book starts on a dusty journey through the deserts from Papunya to the Pilbara, that “most majestic stretch of country....the most transformed by human hand”, industrialised beyond Rothwell's (and, surely, Aboriginal) comprehension. Typically, it's an encounter with a perentie lizard on this journey which stimulates the first of Rothwell's wondrous, coruscating digressions into Tolstoy's conversation with an equally idle lizard as reported by Maxim Gorki – who then gave his name to the town where the dissident Soviet scientist Sakharov was exiled, and Sakharov throws up the quotation which starts to reveal the underlying Rothwell project in Quicksilver: “And yet I am unable to imagine the universe and human life without some guiding principle, without a source of spiritual warmth that is non-material and not bound by physical laws”. I believe the word 'quicksilver' only occurs once in the book. It appears during an encounter with Frank Young, the Amata-based Pitjanjtajara elder, who tells Rothwell, “There are things in the canvases people cannot talk about because the sacred» Read More

 

Local Aborigines Back SA Windfarm

Local Aborigines Back SA Windfarm

Posted by Jeremy Eccles | 20.02.17

Despite massive controversy in Canberra about the benefits of renewable energy and its effect on statewide blackouts in South Australia, the irony has emerged that Parliament House's lights are actually going to be powered in future by the wind blowing...» Read More

 

FURTHER THOUGHTS ON KATTER'S BILL

Posted by Jeremy Eccles | 16.02.17

The generally positive reception for Bob Katter MP's introduction into Parliament of a Bill to prohibit “unfair practices in supplying and trading in Indigenous art and merchandise”, about which I wrote on Tuesday, lead me to think further and recall...» Read More

 

KATTER'S LAW

KATTER'S LAW

Posted by Jeremy Eccles | 14.02.17

Yesterday independent MP Bob Katter introduced a private bill to the Federal Parliament which he hopes will stop non-Indigenous people - including foreigners - from exploiting and profiting from the "oldest culture on earth" through the sale of fake Aboriginal...» Read More

 

Warlpiri Act of Memory

Warlpiri Act of Memory

Posted by Jeremy Eccles | 09.02.17

Today, the UNESCO 'Memory of the World' Australian Register has accepted on to a list of just 57-precious items a collection of drawings made by Warlpiri people in the 1950s. It consists of 169 crayon drawings collected by noted anthropologist...» Read More

 

Japanese 'Didg' Star in Sydney

Japanese 'Didg' Star in Sydney

Posted by Jeremy Eccles | 07.02.17

News Source: Press Release Japanese artist and musician, Hiroki Morimoto, more popularly known as the artist Goma, is being brought to Sydney for the first time by The Japan Foundation for a special performance of his didgeridoo music for one...» Read More

 

BAYALA

BAYALA

Posted by Jeremy Eccles | 06.02.17

“Language is the one thing that underpins our culture as a race”, declared 'Uncle' Stan Grant Snr at a key talking session during the Sydney Festival. And Bayala means 'speak' in the local Sydney language bayalaed by the various groups...» Read More

 

Kudditji Kngwarreye Dies

Kudditji Kngwarreye Dies

Posted by Aboriginal Art Directory | 24.01.17

Kudditji Kngwarreye died yesterday in Alice Springs after a long illness. Born in the 1920's, Kudditji Kngwarreye was half-brother to the famous Emily Kame Kngwarreye (dec. 1996). An Anmatyerre Elder and custodian of many important Dreamings in Utopia, including the...» Read More

 

Current Exhibitions


Industry Corner: Industry

QUICKSILVER

Posted by Jeremy Eccles | 24.02.17

Nicolas Rothwell surprises, delights...and frustrates. The premiere writer about Indigenous culture in the country has written a book (though it's advertised as a collection of essays) which is poised on the brink of being a definitive study of the relationship...» Read More

Industry Corner: Industry

FURTHER THOUGHTS ON KATTER'S BILL

Posted by Jeremy Eccles | 16.02.17

The generally positive reception for Bob Katter MP's introduction into Parliament of a Bill to prohibit “unfair practices in supplying and trading in Indigenous art and merchandise”, about which I wrote on Tuesday, lead me to think further and recall...» Read More

Events: Event

Japanese 'Didg' Star in Sydney

Posted by Jeremy Eccles | 07.02.17

News Source: Press Release Japanese artist and musician, Hiroki Morimoto, more popularly known as the artist Goma, is being brought to Sydney for the first time by The Japan Foundation for a special performance of his didgeridoo music for one...» Read More

Events: Event

LOTS HAPPENING

Posted by Jeremy Eccles | 04.09.15

So much news to share with you, I'm having to collate it all into a single story: 1. The Istanbul Biennial is about to hit the headlines as Sydney's last Biennale did – with action by the artists involved in...» Read More

 

 


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